Tag Archives: domestic violence

Racism in intimate relationships certificate

2A7836BA-8D1F-4608-83E2-061634649A93Text reads: This is to certify you finally realised that you can’t fuck your way out of racism.

“But I can’t be racist, I have a black lover!”
“I’m not racist, I adore black & brown bodies – they’re so exotic!”
“I’m not racist, I had kids with a black man!”

Racism within intimate relationships can definitely happen. Examples include fetishising people of colour, only doing sex acts with them that you would never do with a white person, or leaving all your positivity in the bedroom. Many bigots, fascists and white supremacy folk seem quite happy to be with people of colour for sex, solely because we are often seen as ‘forbidden’ or ‘animal-like’ if we’re black. If we’re Asian, we’re seen as submissive and docile. White folks can make a start by unlearning all they’ve been told about people of colour, by supporting us, reading anti-racist blogs & books, and by not getting threatened and defensive when POC talk about their experiences. Ditch the #notallwhitepeople , listen and learn if you truly want to change for the better.

 

Violence against Bi women of colour

Research Consultation

Project
Violence against Bisexual Women: Causes, Experiences and Implications for Service Providers

You are being invited to take part in a research project which explores bisexual women’s experiences of violence. Please take your time to read the following and ask the researcher for further information or if anything is unclear.

Purpose of Project

To explore bisexual women’s experiences of violence.
To understand why bisexual women experience higher rates of violence.
To explore bisexual women’s experiences with service providers and provide resources to providers of services which work with bisexual women.
Am I eligible to take part?

To take part in this part of the study you must:

Be a person of colour i.e. a person who is not white.
Either be a (transgender or cisgender) woman or have experiences of being a woman (this may include transgender people of various genders, please ask if you are unsure).
Identify as bisexual, pansexual or queer (you must be romantically and/or sexually attracted to multiple genders).
What does taking part involve?

This part of the research is a consultation with bi women of colour to allow them to influence the research process. The purpose of this is to ensure that bi women of colour are included throughout this study.

If you agree to take part you will be briefed about the aims of the project and the design of the research. You will be asked for feedback on recruitment of participants, structure of interviews and invited to be part of future consultations.

This can take place in person (the researcher will travel to you) or over skype/telephone.

What are the possible risks of taking part?

You will not directly be asked about your own experiences of violence, however you may find the session emotional and distressing. It may bring back painful or upsetting memories. If this happens, this is completely normal. Please use the contact numbers at the bottom of this page to access support if this happens to you.

Please also feel welcome to contact the researcher who can direct you to appropriate support. It is important to remember that the researcher is not a qualified mental health professional, counsellor or therapist and cannot provide you with professional support.

What are the possible benefits of taking part?

There are no immediate benefits to participants. It is hoped that this work will contribute to understanding of an under-researched subject and group. The research also intends to contribute to creating research led resources for services which work with bisexual women, as well as to the bisexual activist community.

About the researcher

Sally-Anne Beverley is a doctoral researcher at the University of Leeds. She is a white, bisexual, cisgender woman who has experienced intimate partner violence.  

For further information or to take part please contact

Sally-Anne Beverley s.e.beverley@leeds.ac.uk      

For support

For urgent police or medical help 999 or NHS 111

Refuge www.refuge.org.uk 0808 2000 247

Women’s Aid www.womensaid.org.uk ‎ 0808 2000 247

Rape Crisis https://rapecrisis.org.uk 0808 802 9999

Galop (LGBT Domestic Abuse Helpline) http://www.galop.org.uk 0800 999 5428

Forced Marriage Unit Helpline 0207 008 0151

Halo Project (Honour Base Violence, Forced Marriage, FGM Helpline) http://www.haloproject.org.uk/ 01642 683 045

My invitation to meet the Prime Minister

I was invited to attend the LGBT reception with the UK Prime Minister, representing Bi’s of Colour.

It’s a short story: I chose not to go.

*Sisters Uncut http://www.sistersuncut.org battle daily to support women and girls who are victims/survivors of domestic violence.  The government has cut 32 women’s refuges. (I’m a survivor of domestic violence)

*Broken Rainbow, the only UK charity to support LGBT victims of domestic violence, have to constantly strive to secure funding from the government. (I’m a bisexual survivor of domestic violence – Broken Rainbow were invaluable to me)

*I am a former runaway and homeless person.  (I have been fortunate enough to have been housed,) but the number of homeless people in the UK has risen by huge amounts under the Conservative government.

*Disabled people have had their mobility aids, Carer rooms and independence payments taken away. (I am disabled, with a long-term chronic illness, and various mental health conditions)

*This event is probably being organised by the same person who let the hate group, UKIP, march at London Pride. (I used to be on the community advisory board of London Pride, until they screwed me over)

*Several members of Bi’s of Colour were very worried about how I would be treated if I attended the LGBT reception.

I would like to think I could influence the Prime Minister; tell him to not be such a shitty person, but I doubt I’d even be allowed to get close.  There will be other bisexual activists at the reception.  There will be other People of Colour there too, but there probably won’t be any bisexual people of colour present.  I have mixed feelings about that, but my strong feelings are all about how badly the government has treated people just like me.  I have limited energy, and am at risk of burning out, so I’m quite happy to give this event a miss, and use my spoons to support people like me instead.